90 posts categorized "Mergers & Acquisitions"


IoT Application Platforms – What Company Will Take the Next Bite?

Few areas of technology or business can match the current levels of interest and anticipation surrounding the internet of things (IoT). Embedded engineering organizations and enterprises alike are struggling to keep pace with the expected rate of IoT change. They are rapidly modifying their business plans to pursue new service revenue opportunities enabled by the IoT. But challenges from tighter time-to-market windows and project requirements that extend far beyond existing internal skill sets is yet again recasting the traditional software build-versus-buy calculation. More organizations now recognize the need for new third-party development and management platforms to help them jumpstart IoT application creation and monetization.

VDC Research initiated coverage of this dynamic segment with the recent publication of the IoT Application Development and Deployment Platform (ADDP) market report. The executive summary is available here. We forecast revenue from IoT ADDP solutions is forecast to expand at over 40% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) through 2016. As one might expect, this pace of revenue growth in the ADDP segment and the IoT at large has drawn the attention of larger software and system solution providers.

As part of PTC’s strategy to supply “closed-loop lifecycle management” for systems engineering, the company bought two of the leading ADDP suppliers. (See more on this strategy here) PTC acquired ThingWorx in December 2013 and Axeda in August 2014. In March 2015, IBM announced plans to invest $3 billion in a new 'Internet of Things' unit over the next four years. But the Amazon acquisition of 2lemetry, also in March 2015, demonstrates that interest in entering this sector is not be limited to organizations currently competing in the ALM or PLM solutions market.

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As the IoT matures, more embedded devices and back-end enterprise systems will continue to be linked together over communication networks in order to provide differentiating and lucrative services. Companies viewing the rapidly expanding ADDP opportunity as an adjacent market will come from broad range of segments including providers of operating systems, semiconductors, telecommunication networks, computing hardware/modules, enterprise back-end systems, and other software solutions. Independent providers of IoT application platforms should plan for new competitors and potential suitors from a number of domains.

Stay tuned, we expect that more companies with deep pockets and expansive sales distribution will likely follow the lead of Amazon and PTC by entering the ADDP segment via acquisition in the next few years.


For more information, we invite you inquire about our research and download the executive summary of our IoT Application Development and Deployment Platform; it is available here.


Where To Next For PTC After ColdLight Analytics Acquisition?

PTC logoAt this month’s LiveWorx event put on by PTC (formerly known as Parametric Technology Corp.), the news highlight was the company’s acquisition of IoT analytics firm ColdLight. (See press release here.) ColdLight’s Neuron software for cloud or on-premise datacenters applies machine learning technology to M2M and IoT data, automating predictive analytics tasks. The ColdLight acquisition was a logical extension to PTC’s prior acquisition of ThingWorx and Axeda in the IoT space.

At the front end of the product development process, PTC has assembled software offerings for product lifecycle management (Windchill), computer-aided design (Creo), application lifecycle management and systems engineering (Integrity). Combined with service lifecycle management and the IoT pieces, PTC has essentially created a set of end-to-end solutions for IoT product development and deployment. However, VDC believes that PTC could do more to fill out the middle of its end-to-end portfolio.

Design of embedded devices generally consists of three major areas: mechanical engineering, electronic engineering, and software development. PTC has the first and last of those well covered, but it offers little in the way of electronic engineering tools, save for electronic design automation software for circuit boards, acquired with the company OHIO Design Automation back in 2004 (and since integrated into Windchill).

There are many types of electronic hardware system development tools, and it may be challenging for PTC to dip another toe into that market without diving in completely. Nevertheless, VDC believes that one particular type of electronic design tool would dovetail nicely with PTC’s software development offerings without necessarily getting the company in over its head in electronic design:  virtual prototyping/simulation. Such tools enable the simulation of electronic hardware systems. Although virtual prototyping is often used by semiconductor makers to simulate the behavior of their own chips prior to fabrication, a growing market for virtual prototyping is as a tool for software developers to get a head start on their development work prior to the existence of physical prototypes of the electronic hardware.

PTC already offers mechanical/CAD simulation for Creo. An electronic hardware simulation tool could enable earlier software development for customers using PTC’s Integrity, acting as a bridge between hardware and software development.

Wherever PTC chooses to aim next, its acquisition days aren't over.


QNX Ex-Owner Harman International Acquires Red Bend Software


Harman International is best known as an audio electronics maker, owning numerous brand names targeting consumers and professionals, including AKG, Crown, dbx, Harman Kardon, Infinity, JBL, Lexicon, Mark Levinson, and Revel. As old-school “car stereos” have evolved in recent years into multifunction “infotainment systems,” Harman has also become a major player in automotive electronics.

Red_Bend_Logo_HorizontalOn January 22, Harman announced its acquisition for $170 million of Red Bend Software, which is the leading provider of software and services for Firmware Over The Air (FOTA) updating for mobile devices and automobiles. (See press release here.) Harman simultaneously announced its acquisition of software services firm Symphony Teleca, although Red Bend has more interesting implications for IoT.

QNXBack in 2004, Harman had acquired for $138 million QNX Software Systems, developer of the real-time operating system QNX Neutrino, as well as a number of other embedded software solutions which have since become especially popular in the automotive market. Fast forward to 2010 when Harman sold off QNX for $200 million to Research In Motion (RIM, since re-named Blackberry Limited for its line of mobile phones). At the time, Harman said about its sale of QNX, “This move allows Harman to continue its relationship with QNX and the advanced software solutions it provides to Harman and our customers. At the same time, this deal achieves value for all stakeholders and is an important step in a new strengthened relationship with RIM.”

Perhaps Harman’s sale of QNX was influenced by economic conditions during the Great Recession, but it leads us back to Harman’s acquisition of Red Bend, and it raises a few questions:

  • Would Harman have been able to leverage synergy between Red Bend and QNX in the automotive market if it had retained ownership of both? If not, why not? If so, might the value of such synergy have outweighed the gains realized by selling QNX?

  • What value does Harman now see in Red Bend that it no longer saw in QNX?

  • Considering that much of Red Bend’s current business is in the mobile phone industry, does Harman view Red Bend as a stepping stone into that market?

  • What would it take for Harman to believe that a potential future sale of Red Bend might “achieve value” for stakeholders and produce “a new strengthened relationship”?

We‘ll leave these questions for readers to ponder for themselves


Is this a run on static analysis?

The static analysis solutions market is one of the most dynamic segments VDC’s embedded software team currently tracks. While still a relatively young and evolving technology, static analysis has rapidly become a standard -- perhaps even necessary -- element of the software development lifecycle. Software is emerging as the primary agent for differentiation and resource investment for more companies as they try to speed the delivery of innovative new solutions. The development of increasingly complex software needed for these devices and systems is accelerating growth of code quality and security issues that static analysis is designed to address. In parallel, there is a growing awareness of the potentially catastrophic impact of software failure. As a result, we expect static analysis tools to generate revenue growth exceeding many other tooling segments.

“Strong forecasted growth and the presence of several profitable, small, and privately owned companies among market leaders make the segment (static analysis) ripe for mergers and acquisitions.”  - VDC Research, Stategic Insights 2013, The Global Market for Automated Testing and Verification Tools

Earlier this week Synopsys, a prominent supplier of electronic design automation and semiconductor IP solutions, announced it reached an agreement to purchase Coverity for approximately $375M (US).

The news is compelling for several reasons. Code analysis offerings of Coverity represent a logical expansion of the existing Synopsys portfolio into an adjacent technology area. The acquisition of Coverity would provide Synopsys with the leading vendor share position in the static analysis tool market, a segment expanding at a compound annual growth rate greater than 15%. Furthermore, the combined sales teams and existing customer bases should provide excellent opportunities for both Coverity and Synopsys to increase sales into new realms, primarily the semiconductor and ISV markets, respectively.

The Coverity acquisition by Synopsys should not be viewed in isolation. There was another acquisition of a leading code analysis supplier in January, when Rogue Wave Software purchased Klocwork. We see the opportunity for many of the same synergistic benefits to the Klocwork/Rogue Wave integration as in the Synopsys/Coverity combination. It will be interesting to see if these recent acquistions provide the necessary impetus for more potential suitors to buy one of the remaining independent static analysis tool suppliers.


Trusteer Your Security to IBM: Acquisition Fortifies Security Portfolio

On August 15th, IBM (NYSE:IBM) announced it reached a deal to acquire Trusteer, a Boston-based software-security firm focusing on financial and enterprise cyberthreats. As part of the deal, IBM will absorb Trusteer’s R&D lab in Tel Aviv into its security organization. One major focal point for Trusteer is their mobile security product line, which focuses on preventing intrusion and data theft through enterprise-connected mobile devices.

Smartphones and tablets are becoming integral tools for large and small businesses alike. Mobile devices – like an iPhone equipped with the SalesForce app – are a huge benefit to employees and their employer by allowing them to work remotely and efficiently while away from the office, but these devices also introduce a new set of vulnerabilities into an organization’s security. Our data shows that a large number of these devices have exploitable security flaws that leave sensitive enterprise data vulnerable. A mobile device connected to an enterprise’s network provides a link into the organization that many aren’t adequately protecting.

This acquisition reinforces two key trends: security is an increasingly important factor for all organizations and more needs to be done to protect valuable data from theft. As the number of end-points an organization deals with increases, so does the risk for a security breach. IBM recognizes this and plans to use the Trusteer acquisition to improve its enterprise security products, but the same principles hold true in the embedded industry.

The embedded world is more connected than ever before and this trend continues to grow. Thinking back to famous malware threats such as Stuxnet infiltrating networked manufacturing platforms, it’s clear that inadequate protection of these systems is a major vulnerability to users of embedded software and hardware. Purchasing Trusteer highlights a developing industry trend: end-point protection is becoming a new priority for businesses, embedded or enterprise, in order to keep cyberthreats from harming their operations.

For more information on VDC’s research about security in the embedded industry, click here.


By Zach D. McCabe,

Research Assistant, M2M & Embedded Technology


The Embedded Software Beat

Part two of a Q&A with Matt Klassen, Director of Product and Solutions Marketing at PTC. (See part one)

This interview is part of an ongoing series we conduct with embedded software solution providers to share views on their company, products, and state of the market.

VDC:  When PTC acquired MKS, James Heppelmann, president and CEO of PTC said, “Software engineering has become a fundamental backbone element in today’s product development process.” Indeed, embedded systems continue to grow in complexity and software is defining an ever greater portion of end product value. Given that environment, can you tell us a bit about how the combination of Integrity with PTC’s PLM solutions is addressing some of the challenges facing manufacturers today?

Klassen: PTC is addressing many software intensive product manufacturing challenges head on.  Integrity allows engineers to author, connect, and manage a wide range of development artifacts from requirements to design to code and test. Furthermore, Integrity offers unprecedented reuse and traceability providing efficient change management, even across product variants. This gives management a real-time view of software release readiness in the context of the product engineering cycle.  When used in combination with Windchill, Integrity extends PLM to include robust requirements management, software management, and crossed discipline change management.

VDC: Has the acquisition resulted in new markets or opportunities for the Integrity solution than was available under MKS?

Klassen: PTC gave Integrity global reach and with a loyal customer base. Integrity has been introduced to a host of new customers that have invested heavily in our ALM technology. These customers include HKMC, Huawei, Cummins, John Deere, and Ingersoll Rand to name a few.

VDC: We’re seeing Agile software development methodologies gain broader acceptance across a range of embedded verticals. How does a solution like Integrity help support a transition to iterative development?

Klassen: PTC Integrity ensures a smooth transition to iterative and agile methodologies by providing a flexible scalable Scrum based template that allows enterprises to use traditional, agile or hybrid methods across a distributed set of teams. In addition, Integrity’s support for regulatory compliance standards and ability to reuse requirements, test and code in an Agile environment is unique.

VDC: If you could accurately predict the future, how do see the opportunities for the embedded software market shaping up over in the coming year?

Klassen: The embedded software market will only continue to grow its products to become smart systems of systems.  As companies realize that it is more profitable to transform their products into services, software will enable and deliver the continuous stream of value to products already in the market such that servicing, fixing, upgrading and even offering new features will become much more efficient, less expensive and provide longer life expectancies for many products.  Companies that are able to manage the explosive growth of software efficiently and effectively in the context of the product lifecycle will thrive.  PTC’s strategy is very focused on this market force.

VDC: Thank you, Mark.

Interested in participating in VDC’s “The Embedded Software Beat” series of interviews? Please reach out and let us know.

Matt KlassenMatt Klassen
is passionate about helping customers improve the way they build software intensive products and has been helping organizations excel with software for 20 years.  In his role as Director of ALM Solutions Marketing, Mr. Klassen is responsible for leading the effort to define, market, and sell PTC software and systems engineering management solutions built on PTC Integrity.  With many years working with customers on their complex software systems, Matt has the in knowledge to understand customer challenges across the software development lifecycle in many industries including medical devices, automotive, aerospace, and high tech electronics.  Matt has been a featured speaker at many conferences and events.



The Embedded Software Beat

Part one of a Q&A with Matt Klassen, Director of Product and Solutions Marketing at PTC.

This interview is part of an ongoing series we conduct with embedded software solution providers to share views on their company, products, and state of the market.

VDC’s Embedded Software team was fortunate to catch up with Mr. Klassen shortly after the 2013 PTC Live Global, PTC’s annual event for engineers, IT and service professionals to network, hear corporate updates, learn, and listen to interesting customer presentations.

VDC: PTC has been supporting the embedded industry since 1985. Can you briefly introduce the company to our readers?

Klassen: PTC started as a CAD software provider and revolutionized that market with Pro/ENGINEER, the industry's first successful rule-based constraint (sometimes called "parametric" or "variational") 3D CADmodeling system.  In the late 90’s, PTC acquired Windchill Technology Inc. and launched the first internet based PLM solution which has grown into a half billion dollar business.  In 2011 PTC acquired MKS, a leading provider of ALM solutions, to address the engineering challenges as products transform into smart, software intensive systems.  

VDC: For anyone who may have missed the event, what were some of the highlights of the 2013 PTC Live Global?

Klassen: There were a lot of highlights at this year’s conference, but as usual, our customers really took center stage.  The keynotes on both Monday and Tuesday featured several marquis customers that underscored Jim Heppelmann’s talk on the forces that are transforming the way products are designed, manufactured and serviced.  Forces like digitization, globalization, compliance, personalization, software intensive products, connectivity, and servitization are all at work in the market and manufacturers that embrace these by transforming their process and tool landscape, will be positioned to lead the market.  PTC is positioned to partner with these companies to provide guidance and technology to do just that.

VDC: What challenges do engineers face today in designing and developing embedded devices and how are embedded software suppliers responding?

Klassen:  Engineers face a whole host of challenges today including:

-       Reusing software development artifacts across product variants

-       Cross engineering discipline collaboration

-       Taking advantage of Agile methods in highly complex and regulated environments

-       Managing the high velocity of software driven change and implications across discliplines

Traditional ALM vendors are not addressing these challenges very effectively.  Traditional PLM vendors are trying to address these challenges but their hardware oriented solutions are ill-equipped.  PTC has a unique opportunity to address these challenges with an integrated ALM and PLM set of solutions. 

Please check back on Tuesday 6/25 for part 2 of this discussion with Matt Klassen, Director of Product and Solutions Marketing at PTC

Matt KlassenMatt Klassen is passionate about helping customers improve the way they build software intensive products and has been helping organizations excel with software for 20 years.  In his role as Director of ALM Solutions Marketing, Mr. Klassen is responsible for leading the effort to define, market, and sell PTC software and systems engineering management solutions built on PTC Integrity.  With many years working with customers on their complex software systems, Matt has the in knowledge to understand customer challenges across the software development lifecycle in many industries including medical devices, automotive, aerospace, and high tech electronics.  Matt has been a featured speaker at many conferences and events.




IBM Bolsters DevOps Support with UrbanCode Acquisition

On Monday, IBM announced the acquisition of UrbanCode, a provider of software delivery automation solutions. UrbanCode’s continuous release and deployment tools will be integrated into the IBM Rational portfolio to bolster their DevOps capabilities.              

…software is eating the world.” – Marc Andreessen

Software has emerged as the primary agent for differentiation for a growing number of companies. It is defining a greater portion of end-value for organization’s solutions, but also consuming an ever-larger share of their development costs. Many of these companies have re-evaluated their processes and adopted Agile methodologies to help speed software development. Our findings suggest this has helped. In VDC’s 2012 software and system developer survey, engineers using Agile were more likely to be ahead of schedule on their current project, despite code bases three times as large as those not using iterative methods.

“Companies that master effective software development and delivery in rapidly changing environments such as cloud, mobile and social will have a significant competitive advantage,” - Kristof Kloeckner, general manager, IBM Rational Software.

Unfortunately, Agile methodologies only address the software development. Just increasing the pace of software design can place considerable strain on an organization and result in bottlenecks elsewhere in the development lifecycle. To move in the right direction, development and operations need to operate at the same velocity. This is where the incorporating the UrbanCode Application Release Automation should provide synergy. By automating much of the testing and deployment processes, organizations can speed up the operations side of their business to match the pace of the Agile software development.

Integration of the UrbanCode offerings into IBM Rational’s portfolio represents a valuable extension of their DevOps implementation support. We expect much of the initial market traction to come from enterprise applications. However, with the volume of embedded software code continuing to grow while project timelines shrink, this approach will increasingly resonate in several embedded industries.

More insight

For further investigation and discussion about Agile development, DevOps and other important shifts in systems lifecycle management, please see our 2012 Software & Systems Lifecycle Management Tools Market Intelligence Service. 


VDC’s Top 12 of 2012 – Part 2

In case you missed it, I unveiled the first half of our list on Monday. A brief review (see Monday’s post for more details), and then on to the top 6!

12. GrammaTech introduces architecture visualization system for CodeSonar (March 27th)

11. LDRA forms LDRA Certification Services (March 26th)

10. Enea joins the embedded Linux party (March 27th)

8 and 9. Siemens and PTC expand their lifecycle management coverage through acquisitions (Siemens/LMS International: November 8th, PTC/Servigistics: August 8th)

7. General Dynamics acquires OK Labs (September 11th)

6. Thales acquires SYSGO (November 15th)

SYSGO joins the list of leading embedded/real-time operating systems vendors (Wind River, MontaVista Software, and QNX Software Systems) that has been acquired since the middle of 2009. As SYSGO’s VP of Marketing Jacques Brygier told our blog earlier this month, “SYSGO remains the same with just more financial backup to move forward. The company keeps its identity, management team, full staff, and offices. It is Thales’ willingness to let SYSGO decide its own growth strategy, including the choice of market segments Thales is not involved with.” We are not sure that Wind River and Green Hills Software are worried just yet, but if Thales holds true to this strategy for its new subsidiary, the competition could start heating up.

5. IBM announces Rational Engineering Lifecycle Manager (September 5th)

As software continues to play a greater role in providing product differentiation and innovation, the convergence of ALM and PLM has become a particularly hot topic and an important business opportunity. RELM is the key element of IBM’s cross-domain integration strategy, and is designed to help engineering teams visualize, analyze, and organize engineering data and their relationships.

4. Coverity launches the Coverity Security Research Laboratory (January 24th)

If I had to pick one main theme that best defined 2012, it would be security. The Internet of Things phenomenon has pushed the concept of security to the forefront of consumers’ minds, and as a result the engineering community has become increasingly focused on building security into their devices. To that end, Coverity launched its Security Research Laboratory (SRL), which is dedicated to vulnerability research and the discovery of new and existing defects in software code. SRL includes a wide range of security experts from industry and academia.

3. Oracle releases two new Java Embedded products (September 25th)

As I wrote in September, survey data over the last several years has uncovered a surge in the use of Java in embedded designs. Oracle’s release of Java ME Embedded 3.2 and Java Embedded Suite 7.0 is indicative of the company’s recognition of this trend and its intent to aggressively target embedded developers. Also considering the momentum behind the Java-based Android platform, it certainly seems that 2013 may be the year of Java in embedded.

2. Microsoft unveils Windows Embedded roadmap (November 14th)

The release of Windows 8, new Windows phones, and the Surface tablet brought with it a great deal of speculation around the future of Microsoft’s various Windows Embedded platforms. In mid-November, Microsoft finally revealed their plans, which, not surprisingly, included yet another naming convention change. A few highlights:

  • Windows Embedded Standard 7 will become Windows Embedded 8 Standard (GA: March)
  • Windows Embedded Enterprise will become Windows Embedded 8 Professional (GA: March)
  • Windows Embedded POSReady will become Windows Embedded 8 Industry (CTP: January)
  • Windows Embedded Compact 7 will become Windows Embedded Compact 2013 (GA: Q2 '13)
  • More details on Windows Embedded 8 Handheld and Windows Embedded 8 Automotive are expected to be released early next year.

1. Intel rolls out the Intelligent Systems Framework (September 11th)

Intel continued its heavy push into embedded at the Intel Developer Forum this past September, when it announced the Intelligent Systems Framework (ISF). Another announcement driven by the Internet of Things phenomenon, ISF is a broad specification for intelligent devices in a wide range of industries, from medical and industrial to digital signage and home automation. The framework is “designed to address connecting, managing, and securing devices and data in a consistent and scalable manner,” and includes hardware, operating systems, tools, and other software components.

There are two key reasons ISF earned the top spot in our rankings. First is the impressive list of companies that have pledged their support, which includes Advantech, Arrow Electronics, Avnet, Dell, Digi International, Eurotech, Kontron, and of course Intel subsidiaries McAfee and Wind River. The second – and perhaps more important – reason is simply the attention it has received. People are talking about it. People want to know more about it. In the short time since its release, we have fielded numerous calls from various industry participants looking to discuss ISF and how it may impact the industry moving forward. For those reasons, we believe Intel’s Intelligent Systems Framework was the most significant/noteworthy embedded software announcement of 2012.

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So that’s our list. And though we checked it twice, I am sure you all might have seen things a little bit differently in 2012. So if you’d like to dispute our rankings, point out something that didn’t make the list at all, or even shower us with praise, we would love to hear from you in the comments section.

Here’s looking forward to even more game-changing innovations for embedded in 2013 and beyond!


VDC’s Top 12 of 2012 – Part 1

The end of the year is always a great time for reflection, for thinking about everything that happened throughout the year and what it all means. It is also a great time for making lists; Christmas lists, New Year’s resolutions, and Best Ofs. I won’t get into my New Year’s resolutions here, but I will take a few moments to highlight (and rank, just for fun) the most significant embedded software announcements of the past year.

So, without further ado, here is our take on the best of 2012!


12. GrammaTech introduces architecture visualization system for CodeSonar (March 27th)

This system is designed to optimize the visual inspection and analysis of software through a sophisticated new interface for viewing the relationships between software program elements. Built to handle very large code bases, we believe this product represents a unique solution that has the ability to materially impact the way developers test and analyze their source code. CodeSonar visualization runs through a browser such as Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome.

11. LDRA forms LDRA Certification Services (March 26th)

Attaining safety-critical certifications has long been a time-consuming and laborious task for embedded developers. In response to this challenge, LDRA formed a separate division of the company (staffed by credentialed industry experts) dedicated to facilitating the certification process for various FAA/EASA regulations. LDRA addresses the following standards: Aircraft & Systems Development (ARP-4754A), Safety Assessment (ARP-4761), Integrated Modular Avionics (DO-297), Flight Electronic Hardware (DO-254), Flight Software (DO-178B/C), and Ground Systems (DO-278/A).

10. Enea joins the embedded Linux party (March 27th)

This was a bit of an about-face for Enea, which had previously supported embedded Linux development through its services arm and reseller agreements with Linux vendors such as TimeSys. Enea Linux – which is intended to target next-generation networking infrastructure equipment – is a Yocto-based distribution available with customized services and support. This came on the heels of the release of another new commercial distribution, Mentor Embedded Linux (Mentor Graphics). The question for both Enea and Mentor, of course, is whether or not “late to the party” is good enough.

8 and 9. Siemens and PTC expand their lifecycle management coverage through acquisitions (Siemens/LMS International: November 8th, PTC/Servigistics: August 8th)

The complexity of today’s projects is increasing the dependence of each engineering discipline on the functionality of the other disciplines. The lines between software, electrical, and mechanical engineering have started to blur, necessitating a higher frequency of communication and coordination between these once separate groups. These acquisitions are further evidence that the concept of developing a cross-domain approach to providing solutions to this market has been one of the main overarching themes of 2012.

Siemens’ acquisition of LMS International will allow the company to extend their systems driven product development support through integrated test management, while Servigistics’ presence in PTC’s portfolio will enable PTC to better help its customers service their products under development.

7. General Dynamics acquires OK Labs (September 11th)

According to GD, OK Labs will deploy its OKL4 Microvisor in secure mobile devices (for civilian, government, and military use) and automotive in-vehicle infotainment systems as part of the GD Broadband business unit – presumably within both internal and commercial opportunities. But will commercial opportunities actually be there? For years, suppliers of mobile hypervisors have struggled to effectively communicate the value proposition of their solutions. As a result, revenues never really scaled and leading vendors struggled to realize significant growth. In the case of OK Labs, this ultimately resulted in acquisition. Given the historical difficulties in monetizing mobile virtualization, we believe it may be only a matter of time before GD completely internalizes the use of OKL4 technology.

Part 2 on Wednesday!

Come back on Wednesday for the second half of this list, including our pick for the top announcement of the year!

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