87 posts categorized "Mergers & Acquisitions"

02/21/2014

Is this a run on static analysis?

The static analysis solutions market is one of the most dynamic segments VDC’s embedded software team currently tracks. While still a relatively young and evolving technology, static analysis has rapidly become a standard -- perhaps even necessary -- element of the software development lifecycle. Software is emerging as the primary agent for differentiation and resource investment for more companies as they try to speed the delivery of innovative new solutions. The development of increasingly complex software needed for these devices and systems is accelerating growth of code quality and security issues that static analysis is designed to address. In parallel, there is a growing awareness of the potentially catastrophic impact of software failure. As a result, we expect static analysis tools to generate revenue growth exceeding many other tooling segments.

“Strong forecasted growth and the presence of several profitable, small, and privately owned companies among market leaders make the segment (static analysis) ripe for mergers and acquisitions.”  - VDC Research, Stategic Insights 2013, The Global Market for Automated Testing and Verification Tools

Earlier this week Synopsys, a prominent supplier of electronic design automation and semiconductor IP solutions, announced it reached an agreement to purchase Coverity for approximately $375M (US).

The news is compelling for several reasons. Code analysis offerings of Coverity represent a logical expansion of the existing Synopsys portfolio into an adjacent technology area. The acquisition of Coverity would provide Synopsys with the leading vendor share position in the static analysis tool market, a segment expanding at a compound annual growth rate greater than 15%. Furthermore, the combined sales teams and existing customer bases should provide excellent opportunities for both Coverity and Synopsys to increase sales into new realms, primarily the semiconductor and ISV markets, respectively.

The Coverity acquisition by Synopsys should not be viewed in isolation. There was another acquisition of a leading code analysis supplier in January, when Rogue Wave Software purchased Klocwork. We see the opportunity for many of the same synergistic benefits to the Klocwork/Rogue Wave integration as in the Synopsys/Coverity combination. It will be interesting to see if these recent acquistions provide the necessary impetus for more potential suitors to buy one of the remaining independent static analysis tool suppliers.

08/19/2013

Trusteer Your Security to IBM: Acquisition Fortifies Security Portfolio

On August 15th, IBM (NYSE:IBM) announced it reached a deal to acquire Trusteer, a Boston-based software-security firm focusing on financial and enterprise cyberthreats. As part of the deal, IBM will absorb Trusteer’s R&D lab in Tel Aviv into its security organization. One major focal point for Trusteer is their mobile security product line, which focuses on preventing intrusion and data theft through enterprise-connected mobile devices.

Smartphones and tablets are becoming integral tools for large and small businesses alike. Mobile devices – like an iPhone equipped with the SalesForce app – are a huge benefit to employees and their employer by allowing them to work remotely and efficiently while away from the office, but these devices also introduce a new set of vulnerabilities into an organization’s security. Our data shows that a large number of these devices have exploitable security flaws that leave sensitive enterprise data vulnerable. A mobile device connected to an enterprise’s network provides a link into the organization that many aren’t adequately protecting.

This acquisition reinforces two key trends: security is an increasingly important factor for all organizations and more needs to be done to protect valuable data from theft. As the number of end-points an organization deals with increases, so does the risk for a security breach. IBM recognizes this and plans to use the Trusteer acquisition to improve its enterprise security products, but the same principles hold true in the embedded industry.

The embedded world is more connected than ever before and this trend continues to grow. Thinking back to famous malware threats such as Stuxnet infiltrating networked manufacturing platforms, it’s clear that inadequate protection of these systems is a major vulnerability to users of embedded software and hardware. Purchasing Trusteer highlights a developing industry trend: end-point protection is becoming a new priority for businesses, embedded or enterprise, in order to keep cyberthreats from harming their operations.

For more information on VDC’s research about security in the embedded industry, click here.

 

By Zach D. McCabe,

Research Assistant, M2M & Embedded Technology

06/25/2013

The Embedded Software Beat

Part two of a Q&A with Matt Klassen, Director of Product and Solutions Marketing at PTC. (See part one)

This interview is part of an ongoing series we conduct with embedded software solution providers to share views on their company, products, and state of the market.

VDC:  When PTC acquired MKS, James Heppelmann, president and CEO of PTC said, “Software engineering has become a fundamental backbone element in today’s product development process.” Indeed, embedded systems continue to grow in complexity and software is defining an ever greater portion of end product value. Given that environment, can you tell us a bit about how the combination of Integrity with PTC’s PLM solutions is addressing some of the challenges facing manufacturers today?

Klassen: PTC is addressing many software intensive product manufacturing challenges head on.  Integrity allows engineers to author, connect, and manage a wide range of development artifacts from requirements to design to code and test. Furthermore, Integrity offers unprecedented reuse and traceability providing efficient change management, even across product variants. This gives management a real-time view of software release readiness in the context of the product engineering cycle.  When used in combination with Windchill, Integrity extends PLM to include robust requirements management, software management, and crossed discipline change management.

VDC: Has the acquisition resulted in new markets or opportunities for the Integrity solution than was available under MKS?

Klassen: PTC gave Integrity global reach and with a loyal customer base. Integrity has been introduced to a host of new customers that have invested heavily in our ALM technology. These customers include HKMC, Huawei, Cummins, John Deere, and Ingersoll Rand to name a few.

VDC: We’re seeing Agile software development methodologies gain broader acceptance across a range of embedded verticals. How does a solution like Integrity help support a transition to iterative development?

Klassen: PTC Integrity ensures a smooth transition to iterative and agile methodologies by providing a flexible scalable Scrum based template that allows enterprises to use traditional, agile or hybrid methods across a distributed set of teams. In addition, Integrity’s support for regulatory compliance standards and ability to reuse requirements, test and code in an Agile environment is unique.

VDC: If you could accurately predict the future, how do see the opportunities for the embedded software market shaping up over in the coming year?

Klassen: The embedded software market will only continue to grow its products to become smart systems of systems.  As companies realize that it is more profitable to transform their products into services, software will enable and deliver the continuous stream of value to products already in the market such that servicing, fixing, upgrading and even offering new features will become much more efficient, less expensive and provide longer life expectancies for many products.  Companies that are able to manage the explosive growth of software efficiently and effectively in the context of the product lifecycle will thrive.  PTC’s strategy is very focused on this market force.

VDC: Thank you, Mark.

Interested in participating in VDC’s “The Embedded Software Beat” series of interviews? Please reach out and let us know.


Matt KlassenMatt Klassen
is passionate about helping customers improve the way they build software intensive products and has been helping organizations excel with software for 20 years.  In his role as Director of ALM Solutions Marketing, Mr. Klassen is responsible for leading the effort to define, market, and sell PTC software and systems engineering management solutions built on PTC Integrity.  With many years working with customers on their complex software systems, Matt has the in knowledge to understand customer challenges across the software development lifecycle in many industries including medical devices, automotive, aerospace, and high tech electronics.  Matt has been a featured speaker at many conferences and events.

 

06/24/2013

The Embedded Software Beat

Part one of a Q&A with Matt Klassen, Director of Product and Solutions Marketing at PTC.

This interview is part of an ongoing series we conduct with embedded software solution providers to share views on their company, products, and state of the market.

VDC’s Embedded Software team was fortunate to catch up with Mr. Klassen shortly after the 2013 PTC Live Global, PTC’s annual event for engineers, IT and service professionals to network, hear corporate updates, learn, and listen to interesting customer presentations.

VDC: PTC has been supporting the embedded industry since 1985. Can you briefly introduce the company to our readers?

Klassen: PTC started as a CAD software provider and revolutionized that market with Pro/ENGINEER, the industry's first successful rule-based constraint (sometimes called "parametric" or "variational") 3D CADmodeling system.  In the late 90’s, PTC acquired Windchill Technology Inc. and launched the first internet based PLM solution which has grown into a half billion dollar business.  In 2011 PTC acquired MKS, a leading provider of ALM solutions, to address the engineering challenges as products transform into smart, software intensive systems.  

VDC: For anyone who may have missed the event, what were some of the highlights of the 2013 PTC Live Global?

Klassen: There were a lot of highlights at this year’s conference, but as usual, our customers really took center stage.  The keynotes on both Monday and Tuesday featured several marquis customers that underscored Jim Heppelmann’s talk on the forces that are transforming the way products are designed, manufactured and serviced.  Forces like digitization, globalization, compliance, personalization, software intensive products, connectivity, and servitization are all at work in the market and manufacturers that embrace these by transforming their process and tool landscape, will be positioned to lead the market.  PTC is positioned to partner with these companies to provide guidance and technology to do just that.

VDC: What challenges do engineers face today in designing and developing embedded devices and how are embedded software suppliers responding?

Klassen:  Engineers face a whole host of challenges today including:

-       Reusing software development artifacts across product variants

-       Cross engineering discipline collaboration

-       Taking advantage of Agile methods in highly complex and regulated environments

-       Managing the high velocity of software driven change and implications across discliplines

Traditional ALM vendors are not addressing these challenges very effectively.  Traditional PLM vendors are trying to address these challenges but their hardware oriented solutions are ill-equipped.  PTC has a unique opportunity to address these challenges with an integrated ALM and PLM set of solutions. 

Please check back on Tuesday 6/25 for part 2 of this discussion with Matt Klassen, Director of Product and Solutions Marketing at PTC

Matt KlassenMatt Klassen is passionate about helping customers improve the way they build software intensive products and has been helping organizations excel with software for 20 years.  In his role as Director of ALM Solutions Marketing, Mr. Klassen is responsible for leading the effort to define, market, and sell PTC software and systems engineering management solutions built on PTC Integrity.  With many years working with customers on their complex software systems, Matt has the in knowledge to understand customer challenges across the software development lifecycle in many industries including medical devices, automotive, aerospace, and high tech electronics.  Matt has been a featured speaker at many conferences and events.

 

 

04/22/2013

IBM Bolsters DevOps Support with UrbanCode Acquisition

On Monday, IBM announced the acquisition of UrbanCode, a provider of software delivery automation solutions. UrbanCode’s continuous release and deployment tools will be integrated into the IBM Rational portfolio to bolster their DevOps capabilities.              

…software is eating the world.” – Marc Andreessen

Software has emerged as the primary agent for differentiation for a growing number of companies. It is defining a greater portion of end-value for organization’s solutions, but also consuming an ever-larger share of their development costs. Many of these companies have re-evaluated their processes and adopted Agile methodologies to help speed software development. Our findings suggest this has helped. In VDC’s 2012 software and system developer survey, engineers using Agile were more likely to be ahead of schedule on their current project, despite code bases three times as large as those not using iterative methods.

“Companies that master effective software development and delivery in rapidly changing environments such as cloud, mobile and social will have a significant competitive advantage,” - Kristof Kloeckner, general manager, IBM Rational Software.

Unfortunately, Agile methodologies only address the software development. Just increasing the pace of software design can place considerable strain on an organization and result in bottlenecks elsewhere in the development lifecycle. To move in the right direction, development and operations need to operate at the same velocity. This is where the incorporating the UrbanCode Application Release Automation should provide synergy. By automating much of the testing and deployment processes, organizations can speed up the operations side of their business to match the pace of the Agile software development.

Integration of the UrbanCode offerings into IBM Rational’s portfolio represents a valuable extension of their DevOps implementation support. We expect much of the initial market traction to come from enterprise applications. However, with the volume of embedded software code continuing to grow while project timelines shrink, this approach will increasingly resonate in several embedded industries.

More insight

For further investigation and discussion about Agile development, DevOps and other important shifts in systems lifecycle management, please see our 2012 Software & Systems Lifecycle Management Tools Market Intelligence Service. 

12/26/2012

VDC’s Top 12 of 2012 – Part 2

In case you missed it, I unveiled the first half of our list on Monday. A brief review (see Monday’s post for more details), and then on to the top 6!

12. GrammaTech introduces architecture visualization system for CodeSonar (March 27th)

11. LDRA forms LDRA Certification Services (March 26th)

10. Enea joins the embedded Linux party (March 27th)

8 and 9. Siemens and PTC expand their lifecycle management coverage through acquisitions (Siemens/LMS International: November 8th, PTC/Servigistics: August 8th)

7. General Dynamics acquires OK Labs (September 11th)

6. Thales acquires SYSGO (November 15th)

SYSGO joins the list of leading embedded/real-time operating systems vendors (Wind River, MontaVista Software, and QNX Software Systems) that has been acquired since the middle of 2009. As SYSGO’s VP of Marketing Jacques Brygier told our blog earlier this month, “SYSGO remains the same with just more financial backup to move forward. The company keeps its identity, management team, full staff, and offices. It is Thales’ willingness to let SYSGO decide its own growth strategy, including the choice of market segments Thales is not involved with.” We are not sure that Wind River and Green Hills Software are worried just yet, but if Thales holds true to this strategy for its new subsidiary, the competition could start heating up.

5. IBM announces Rational Engineering Lifecycle Manager (September 5th)

As software continues to play a greater role in providing product differentiation and innovation, the convergence of ALM and PLM has become a particularly hot topic and an important business opportunity. RELM is the key element of IBM’s cross-domain integration strategy, and is designed to help engineering teams visualize, analyze, and organize engineering data and their relationships.

4. Coverity launches the Coverity Security Research Laboratory (January 24th)

If I had to pick one main theme that best defined 2012, it would be security. The Internet of Things phenomenon has pushed the concept of security to the forefront of consumers’ minds, and as a result the engineering community has become increasingly focused on building security into their devices. To that end, Coverity launched its Security Research Laboratory (SRL), which is dedicated to vulnerability research and the discovery of new and existing defects in software code. SRL includes a wide range of security experts from industry and academia.

3. Oracle releases two new Java Embedded products (September 25th)

As I wrote in September, survey data over the last several years has uncovered a surge in the use of Java in embedded designs. Oracle’s release of Java ME Embedded 3.2 and Java Embedded Suite 7.0 is indicative of the company’s recognition of this trend and its intent to aggressively target embedded developers. Also considering the momentum behind the Java-based Android platform, it certainly seems that 2013 may be the year of Java in embedded.

2. Microsoft unveils Windows Embedded roadmap (November 14th)

The release of Windows 8, new Windows phones, and the Surface tablet brought with it a great deal of speculation around the future of Microsoft’s various Windows Embedded platforms. In mid-November, Microsoft finally revealed their plans, which, not surprisingly, included yet another naming convention change. A few highlights:

  • Windows Embedded Standard 7 will become Windows Embedded 8 Standard (GA: March)
  • Windows Embedded Enterprise will become Windows Embedded 8 Professional (GA: March)
  • Windows Embedded POSReady will become Windows Embedded 8 Industry (CTP: January)
  • Windows Embedded Compact 7 will become Windows Embedded Compact 2013 (GA: Q2 '13)
  • More details on Windows Embedded 8 Handheld and Windows Embedded 8 Automotive are expected to be released early next year.

1. Intel rolls out the Intelligent Systems Framework (September 11th)

Intel continued its heavy push into embedded at the Intel Developer Forum this past September, when it announced the Intelligent Systems Framework (ISF). Another announcement driven by the Internet of Things phenomenon, ISF is a broad specification for intelligent devices in a wide range of industries, from medical and industrial to digital signage and home automation. The framework is “designed to address connecting, managing, and securing devices and data in a consistent and scalable manner,” and includes hardware, operating systems, tools, and other software components.

There are two key reasons ISF earned the top spot in our rankings. First is the impressive list of companies that have pledged their support, which includes Advantech, Arrow Electronics, Avnet, Dell, Digi International, Eurotech, Kontron, and of course Intel subsidiaries McAfee and Wind River. The second – and perhaps more important – reason is simply the attention it has received. People are talking about it. People want to know more about it. In the short time since its release, we have fielded numerous calls from various industry participants looking to discuss ISF and how it may impact the industry moving forward. For those reasons, we believe Intel’s Intelligent Systems Framework was the most significant/noteworthy embedded software announcement of 2012.

- - - - - - - -

 

So that’s our list. And though we checked it twice, I am sure you all might have seen things a little bit differently in 2012. So if you’d like to dispute our rankings, point out something that didn’t make the list at all, or even shower us with praise, we would love to hear from you in the comments section.

Here’s looking forward to even more game-changing innovations for embedded in 2013 and beyond!

12/24/2012

VDC’s Top 12 of 2012 – Part 1

The end of the year is always a great time for reflection, for thinking about everything that happened throughout the year and what it all means. It is also a great time for making lists; Christmas lists, New Year’s resolutions, and Best Ofs. I won’t get into my New Year’s resolutions here, but I will take a few moments to highlight (and rank, just for fun) the most significant embedded software announcements of the past year.

So, without further ado, here is our take on the best of 2012!

 

12. GrammaTech introduces architecture visualization system for CodeSonar (March 27th)

This system is designed to optimize the visual inspection and analysis of software through a sophisticated new interface for viewing the relationships between software program elements. Built to handle very large code bases, we believe this product represents a unique solution that has the ability to materially impact the way developers test and analyze their source code. CodeSonar visualization runs through a browser such as Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome.

11. LDRA forms LDRA Certification Services (March 26th)

Attaining safety-critical certifications has long been a time-consuming and laborious task for embedded developers. In response to this challenge, LDRA formed a separate division of the company (staffed by credentialed industry experts) dedicated to facilitating the certification process for various FAA/EASA regulations. LDRA addresses the following standards: Aircraft & Systems Development (ARP-4754A), Safety Assessment (ARP-4761), Integrated Modular Avionics (DO-297), Flight Electronic Hardware (DO-254), Flight Software (DO-178B/C), and Ground Systems (DO-278/A).

10. Enea joins the embedded Linux party (March 27th)

This was a bit of an about-face for Enea, which had previously supported embedded Linux development through its services arm and reseller agreements with Linux vendors such as TimeSys. Enea Linux – which is intended to target next-generation networking infrastructure equipment – is a Yocto-based distribution available with customized services and support. This came on the heels of the release of another new commercial distribution, Mentor Embedded Linux (Mentor Graphics). The question for both Enea and Mentor, of course, is whether or not “late to the party” is good enough.

8 and 9. Siemens and PTC expand their lifecycle management coverage through acquisitions (Siemens/LMS International: November 8th, PTC/Servigistics: August 8th)

The complexity of today’s projects is increasing the dependence of each engineering discipline on the functionality of the other disciplines. The lines between software, electrical, and mechanical engineering have started to blur, necessitating a higher frequency of communication and coordination between these once separate groups. These acquisitions are further evidence that the concept of developing a cross-domain approach to providing solutions to this market has been one of the main overarching themes of 2012.

Siemens’ acquisition of LMS International will allow the company to extend their systems driven product development support through integrated test management, while Servigistics’ presence in PTC’s portfolio will enable PTC to better help its customers service their products under development.

7. General Dynamics acquires OK Labs (September 11th)

According to GD, OK Labs will deploy its OKL4 Microvisor in secure mobile devices (for civilian, government, and military use) and automotive in-vehicle infotainment systems as part of the GD Broadband business unit – presumably within both internal and commercial opportunities. But will commercial opportunities actually be there? For years, suppliers of mobile hypervisors have struggled to effectively communicate the value proposition of their solutions. As a result, revenues never really scaled and leading vendors struggled to realize significant growth. In the case of OK Labs, this ultimately resulted in acquisition. Given the historical difficulties in monetizing mobile virtualization, we believe it may be only a matter of time before GD completely internalizes the use of OKL4 technology.

Part 2 on Wednesday!

Come back on Wednesday for the second half of this list, including our pick for the top announcement of the year!

12/14/2012

The Embedded Software Beat

A Q&A with Jacques Brygier, VP of Marketing, SYSGO

This interview is the fifth in a series that we have conducted with embedded software solution providers to share their views on their company, products, and state of the market.

VDC: SYSGO has been in the embedded software business for over 20 years; can you briefly introduce the company to our readers?

LogoBrygier: SYSGO has been providing software solutions for the embedded market since its foundation in 1991. The company, headquartered in Mainz, Germany, has developed skills and expertise over the years into two areas, actually very complementary: industrial embedded Linux and safety and security certified RTOS. SYSGO has been quite innovative in addressing the needs of the applications requiring the highest levels of safety and security: the company was the first to introduce to the market a certified embedded virtualization solution that is both a full RTOS and a type 1 hypervisor. SYSGO is primarily addressing the A&D, industrial, transportation, medical and automotive markets, but the combination of Linux/Android, safety and security functionality of its offering attracts new customers in industry sectors like smart energy, high range mobile and even consumers.

VDC: SYSGO recently announced it was acquired by Thales. What does this mean for SYSGO and its customers?

Brygier: This is great news for SYSGO! SYSGO remains the same with just more financial backup to move forward. The company keeps its identity, management team, full staff, and offices. It is Thales’ willingness to let SYSGO decide its own growth strategy, including the choice of market segments Thales is not involved with. We of course have to remain the technology innovator we are in the key sectors of A&D, transportation, and security, in order to provide to Thales (and others) the best-of-breed products they need to be successful. But we are free to continue to address the other markets such as automotive, medical, industrial, or even consumers when it makes sense. Thales’ investment is based on the long term. The requirements they have in terms of product features for their own benefits were part of our roadmap anyway: we just have more means to speed up their implementation.

VDC: What are the challenges engineers face today in designing and developing embedded devices and how are embedded software suppliers responding?

Brygier: More than ever, the embedded systems developers have to manage a tremendous increase of functionality requirements but keep a high level of quality at reasonable cost! New software environments like Linux, Java or Android give access to a wide range of graphics, peripherals, and networking capabilities. However, even as the hardware platforms become more and more powerful (thanks to a growing usage of SoCs, multi-core, specialized built-in devices, etc.), the usual requirement for performance is now combined with a growing need for more safety and, maybe more importantly for most of the markets, security. To say it differently, engineers need new ways of implementing software. That’s probably the reason why we see a growing interest in our safe and secure virtualization RTOS: having the ability on the same hardware (I mean processor) to mix real-time and non-real-time, critical and non-critical applications, legacy and brand new code is very attractive!

VDC: SYSGO’s flagship product, PikeOS, is a combination of an RTOS and virtualization platform; Can you explain the concept of PikeOS, and tell our readers what sets this platform apart from the competition?

Brygier: In the early 2000s, SYSGO decided to develop its own operating system approach based on the embedded virtualization concept. After having evaluated different approaches, SYSGO realized that the existing concepts couldn’t support the highest levels of safety and security requirements SYSGO’s customers were asking for. The result of this internal development is the PikeOS microkernel, which today is part of SYSGO’s product portfolio. The target markets are A&D, industrial automation, automotive, transportation, medical, smart energy, part of consumer electronics and all sectors requiring a high level of security. PikeOS enables multiple operating system interfaces to work on separate sets of resources within a single machine. Because of the resource separation enforced by the PikeOS microkernel, multiple applications with different safety and security requirements are able to co-exist in a single machine. Thus, PikeOS can be regarded as a MILS separation kernel as well as a hypervisor. Currently, PikeOS can host about ten different operating system APIs. Among them are ARINC-653, POSIX, certified POSIX, AUTOSAR, different Java virtual machines, Ada and several popular RTOSes such as Linux (SYSGO’s ELinOS is a natural choice), Android, RTEMS or iTRON. PikeOS is certifiable to safety standards like DO-178B/C, IEC 61508, EN 50128, or ISO 26262, and is currently involved in various security standard CC EAL certification projects.

What makes PikeOS different, besides the fact it has no legacy baggage (making it easy to use), is that it is a) truly processor agnostic, supporting a very wide range of processors and not relying on any specific hardware feature but able to use it if needed (I’m thinking about the use of hardware virtualization to manage multicore, for example), b) built on a single set of core components (no derived version or specific flavor depending on the nature of the application such as non certified or certified, safety oriented or security oriented, cost sensitive, resources constrained or large and complex systems), c) offering the widest range of Personalities of the market (12), and d) the first “hypervisor” certified DO-178B, IEC61508 and EN50128!

VDC: You recently released the latest version of your industrial grade Linux platform, ELinOS; How would you describe the state of the embedded Linux market today?

Brygier: We see an increasing demand for Linux functionality in almost all markets. There is a low but steady rate of growth. Our focus is industrial Linux, a distribution that minimizes the side effect of open source software (potential issues of liability, lack of control, roadmap visibility, documentation, etc…) and offers a ready to use, qualified and well-packaged solution. I don’t know if this gives you an idea of the Linux market but I can tell you that almost half of our PikeOS users are using the Linux Personality. Our understanding is that we cannot make Linux safe and secure but thanks to PikeOS we can make its usage in a system safe and secure.

VDC: SYSGO also provides support for safety & security certifications, two areas that have begun to converge in recent years; what is the relationship between safety and security, and what are some of the challenges engineers face as they pursue these certifications?

Brygier: In terms of objectives, safety is quite different from security: one aims at removing any bugs while the other one tries to prevent any hostile attack. But they share in common the fact that they are required in a growing number of systems, increasingly in a jointly manner. There are some features/attributes PikeOS offers that apply to both areas: strict partitioning, controlled communications, availability of system resources, etc. If you combine the rigorous development process of DO-178B Level A and the formal verification of the microkernel, you tend to have a pretty good piece of software. But, even if they share some aspects of the evidence to be provided to comply with their respective standards, the certification process is quite different in spirit and in ways to assess the compliancy. For safety certification, engineers have a set of guidelines that are now quite familiar and easier to handle when you have some experience. A security certification requires first identifying your assets, the threats you envision and the adverse actions the threats can use to harm your assets. In a sense, the objectives must be very specific. The way for the accredited lab to challenge your equipment depends of course on your security objectives but is mostly not known by you. This explains why the timeline of a high level of security validation is usually more difficult to estimate.

VDC: Thank you, Jacques.

Interested in participating in VDC’s “The Embedded Software Beat” series of interviews? Please reach out and let us know.

BrygierJacques Brygier has spent more than 20 years in the business of high technology and computer science where he has acquired a deep knowledge of the software industry, its evolution and its main application fields. He has been more specifically involved in the development of mission-critical and safety critical software solutions. His primary focus has been embedded and real-time applications. Jacques obtained his Ph.D. in Computer Science in University of Lille, France and then joined Alsys to work on Ada compilers and produce the first Ada products available on the market. After working in different technical positions, he obtained his degree in International Marketing and Business in Minneapolis, USA. As the Marketing Director for Aonix, Jacques spent 5 years in San Diego, USA, developing and promoting software development tools before returning to France where he took the position of VP Sales for 3 years. He then became VP Marketing with worldwide responsibility for product strategy, product management and marketing communication. Jacques joined SYSGO in February 2007 to initiate and lead Product Management and Strategy. As VP Marketing he is in charge of all global marketing activities. His main task is to develop the SYSGO portfolio that includes the safe and secure virtualization RTOS platform PikeOS and the Industrial Grade Embedded Linux ELinOS.

11/09/2012

Siemens buys-in to more cross-domain integration

Early Thursday morning Siemens announced plans to expand their product lifecycle management solution suite through the acquisition of LMS International NV. Read the complete announcement here. With the purchase of LMS, a leading provider of test and mechatronics simulation software to advanced manufacturing industries, Siemens aims to “close the loop” by extending their systems driven product development support through integrated test management.

Siemens held an industry analyst/trade media webcast to further explain the deal. Judging from the comments and questions that followed the presentation, there is widespread support for vision to intelligently integrate all aspect of the product development process; as there should be.

If you follow this blog or our research, no doubt you are aware this is a topic VDC Research has been tracking intently. (Please see some related posts here and here.) We have been hearing widespread interest from both tool suppliers and OEMs for enhanced integration and collaboration between different engineering disciplines. The complexity of today’s projects is increasing the dependence of each engineering discipline on the functionality of the other disciplines. The lines between software, electrical, and mechanical engineering have started to blur, necessitating a higher frequency of communication and coordination between these once separate groups.

For vendors who have developed platforms supporting most, if not all, of the development lifecycle in the field they have supported in the past, developing a cross-domain approach is the logical next step. Leading vendors such as IBM and others have increased their cross-domain development support through partnerships and organic expansion of their solution suite. Other top vendors have begun to broaden their solutions around cross domain integration through M&A activity, as witnessed by Siemens’ planned acquisition of LMS, PTC’s purchase of MKS, and the ANSYS acquisition of Esterel. VDC continues to expect even further M&A activities as these and other vendors look to fill in gaps in their offerings to better address cross-domain integration.

More insight

For further investigation and discussion about the cross-domain integration trend and other important shifts in systems lifecycle management, please see our 2012 Software & Systems Lifecycle Management Tools Market Intelligence Service. This year’s final installment of the intelligence service, an industry brief directly addressing PLM/ALM integration, will be available later this month.

10/24/2012

Is There a Market for Standalone Hypervisors?

The commercial market for mobile virtualization solutions was highly limited even before General Dynamics’ acquisition of Open Kernel Labs last month. Now, with several recent reports indicating that IBM is close to reaching an agreement to buy Red Bend Software, the commercial market may disappear entirely. But is this really that surprising?

For years, suppliers of mobile hypervisors have struggled to effectively communicate the value proposition of their solutions. Initially touted as a technology that can enable reduced bill-of-material costs, mobile virtualization has more recently been evangelized as the way to allow mobile devices to securely support multiple personas. In either case, device manufacturers failed to significantly support either premise – at least in terms of making investments in commercial solutions. As a result, revenues did not scale and leading vendors struggled to realize significant growth.

On the embedded side, the majority of the market is not based on standalone hypervisors. In this segment, virtualization has been primarily instituted as part of a broader runtime platform. Embedded virtualization solutions from vendors such as Green Hills Software, LynuxWorks, SYSGO, and Wind River heavily leverage – and in some cases are completely integrated with – each company’s flagship RTOS platform. Consequently, the success of these vendors has been driven in large part by their solutions’ ability to enable a guest operating system (Android/Linux or Windows, for example) to run alongside an RTOS in a multi-OS environment. Clearly, this value proposition has gained much more traction than the previously described mobile virtualization use cases.

So what do we see as the market moves forward?

According to GD’s press release, OK Labs will deploy its OKL4 Microvisor in secure mobile devices (for civilian, government, and military use) and automotive in-vehicle infotainment systems as part of the GD Broadband business unit – presumably within both internal and commercial opportunities. However, given the historical difficulties in monetizing mobile virtualization, we believe it may be only a matter of time before GD completely internalizes the use of OKL4 technology.

Of course, IBM’s intentions for Red Bend’s virtualization technology have not been publicly discussed, and the storyline is slightly different. Red Bend’s VLX product line (which the company acquired through its 2010 purchase of VirtualLogix) is a small fraction of Red Bend’s total business and is not likely to be the driving factor behind IBM’s interest. A more plausible scenario is that IBM is most focused on Red Bend’s mobile software/device management solutions, which are particularly attractive due to the rapid expansion of the BYOD paradigm. In fact, we suspect that it is possible – perhaps even likely – that IBM has no interest in VLX at all.

All this in mind, we expect that the commercial market for mobile and embedded virtualization solutions will begin to shift more heavily to traditional embedded markets. A large portion of this business will be driven by deployments within device classes utilizing a multi-OS environment in which Android or Windows powers the user interface with an RTOS controlling any critical/deterministic processes. Aside from smaller, specialized vendors such as Real-Time Systems and TenAsys, a majority of these solutions will be integrated runtime platforms as opposed to standalone hypervisor offerings.

VDC will investigate these and other trends in our upcoming report, Virtualization for Mobile & Embedded Systems, from our research service Strategic Insights 2012: Embedded Software & Tools Market. Please contact us for more information.